Earth Day to May Day!

For the third consecutive year, the Global Climate Convergence is bringing together Earth Day and May Day events everywhere for a united movement for people, peace, and planet.

The History of Earth Day

On April 22,1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy, sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies. Thousands of colleges and universities organized protests against the deterioration of the environment. Groups that had been fighting against oil spills, polluting factories and power plants, raw sewage, toxic dumps, pesticides, freeways, the loss of wilderness, and the extinction of wildlife suddenly realized they shared common values.

IWW: The Brief Origins of May Day

Most people living in the United States know little about the International Workers’ Day of May Day. For many others there is an assumption that it is a holiday celebrated in state communist countries like Cuba or the former Soviet Union. Most Americans don’t realize that May Day has its origins here in this country and is as “American” as baseball and apple pie, and stemmed from the pre-Christian holiday of Beltane, a celebration of rebirth and fertility.

Climate activists call for no new oil extraction in New Orleans Superdome protest

Currently, hundreds of climate and social justice activists are occupying the Superdome in New Orleans in a mass protest calling to keep 43 million acres of oil and gas leases in the Gulf of Mexico.

Today, the Obama administration is auctioning off those 43 million acres to the oil and gas industry. Courageous activists have taken a stand to say a resounding “NO” to further oil extraction by the same people that brought us the BP Oil Disaster in 2010 and continue to decimate communities and ecosystems along the Gulf Coast. Our friends aren’t demanding “kinder and gentler” version of drilling, but a stop to new offshore leases and no more drilling.. They’re setting an example for how movements against climate change and social justice can take bigger, bolder action.

INDEPENDENT: Heathrow 13 climate change protesters avoid jail in 'triumph for democracy'

The nightmare has been ended for the Heathrow 13 as they were narrowly spared jail for their high-profile protest against the London airport’s expansion.

District Judge Deborah Wright astonished many legal observers last month by warning that a custodial sentence was “almost inevitable” for the peaceful demonstrators.

But the public outcry against her remarks appeared to have cut through, as she handed the protesters six-week suspended sentences.

Nothing to do, nowhere to go, nothing to say: How the broad climate movement has failed us

…Around the world people are getting radicalized and making bold efforts to save this biosphere we know and love. In the US, Flood the System called for and carried out multiple climate justice actions. The Global Climate Convergence is continuing its work to build a Peoples Climate Strike. Groups like the Indigenous Environmental Network and Climate Justice Alliance are confronting the legacy of colonialism and its damage to land and water. Fossil Fuel Student Divestment Network is organizing to divest universities from the oil and coal companies. Still, the reality is that the broad climate movement in the “developed” world has mostly been a failure and an obstacle to building an effective and truly relevant movement….

COUNTERPUNCH: Demanding the Impossible - Saying “No Compromise” in the Climate Movement, And Meaning It

…As daunting as it sounds the gross agenda of industry, banks and compromised political and not for profit institutions can still be undercut and the worst impacts of the climate and environmental crisis mitigated. Most importantly, the poisoning and polluting of communities on the frontlines of environmental disaster can be stopped. Through history, we’ve seen movements for equality, justice and ecological sanity build power and take on the agenda of the corporations and the politicians that love them.

VICE NEWS: With Protests Banned in Paris, Climate Activists Embrace Other Forms of Expression

The vast conference complex that is hosting the Paris climate summit opened its doors to the general public this morning, just one day after world leaders launched the talks with a round of rallying statements and promises to combat global warming.

The inauguration of the Climate Generations areas was due to take place three days after the world’s largest climate march, which was canceled by French authorities in the wake of the November 13 terror attacks that killed 130 in and around the French capital.

According to organizers, 360 French and international civil society organizations will help bring the conference center to life during the two-week summit, which is expected to attract 40,000 visitors.

Olivia Teter and her daughter Jacqueline Puliati, 20, had traveled all the way from San Francisco to take part in Sunday’s big climate march, and to add their voice “to those who are putting pressure on world leaders.” But like scores of others, Teter and Puliati were turned away from Place de la République by police blocking access to the square. “I was very disappointed, it wasn’t the right answer,” Teter, a climate activist based in Silicon Valley, said.

Any hopes that Teter and her daughter may have had of joining protests near the conference center have also been dashed, with Paris police authorities announcing Tuesday that protests around the Le Bourget site would be banned until December 13 — two days after the end of the talks.