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Nothing to do, nowhere to go, nothing to say: How the broad climate movement has failed us

…Around the world people are getting radicalized and making bold efforts to save this biosphere we know and love. In the US, Flood the System called for and carried out multiple climate justice actions. The Global Climate Convergence is continuing its work to build a Peoples Climate Strike. Groups like the Indigenous Environmental Network and Climate Justice Alliance are confronting the legacy of colonialism and its damage to land and water. Fossil Fuel Student Divestment Network is organizing to divest universities from the oil and coal companies. Still, the reality is that the broad climate movement in the “developed” world has mostly been a failure and an obstacle to building an effective and truly relevant movement….

Join the GCC's Timeka Drew in LA on May Day for "What the Bleep Happened to Hip Hop?"

Hip Hop Congress and Move to Amend and are partnering to present: “What the Bleep Happened to Hip Hop?”, a public education campaign seeking to raise awareness of the dangerous power corporations currently wield over the hip hop industry specifically, and over our society in general.
We invite you to join us on May 1st and 2nd, 2015 when this unique collaboration arrives in Los Angeles, CA. During the day on May 1st, 2015, we will have educational panels and participatory conversations, followed by an artist showcase that night. We will close with a People’s Movement Assembly on Sunday that connects to the United States Social Forum.
The GCC’s own Timeka Drew will be representing the Convergence on the Local Panel May 1. Get more information about his event at the GCC Event Page.

Environmental Justice Classroom Resource Guide

Particularly given the results of the latest report released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, we must ask ourselves some critical questions about how we prepare our children to face the world they will be inheriting, and the harsh truth of today’s conditions and dynamics. How do we ensure that our youth emerge from their studies with an understanding of the intersection between our social, economic, cultural, political, and environmental status in society? How do we teach them their role as influencers of what’s happening in their environment, now and in the future?

The Environmental Justice Classroom Resource Guide provides a list of clearinghouse websites with multiple environmental justice (EJ) resources for various age groups, a list of individual EJ lesson plans for various age groups, and a short list of hip-hop videos/songs to help engage youth in classroom settings and beyond.